A NIGHT IN THE

 CRIMSON TIDE

Benefitting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

text and photos courtesy of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

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On April 5, guests gathered at The Clayton House in Old Town Scottsdale for the 3rd annual gala to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Paying tribute to the co-chairs and honoree’s alma mater, The University of Alabama, this year’s event was titled A Night in the Crimson Tide. Drawing supporters from beyond Arizona, the evening raised more that $260,000.

Keeping with the theme, the venue was transformed into a sea of crimson and houndstooth. The event, filled with Southern charm, featured signature cocktails, a gourmet dinner, live and silent auctions, entertainment and special guest appearances. The raffle, beautiful earrings courtesy of Jacqueline Nerguizian of JN Jewels drew brisk bidding.

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Retired business owner, community volunteer and philanthropist Martha Martin and model and television personality Camerone Parker McCulloch served as co-chairs and hosts for the evening. Dr. Stacie J. Stephenson and Richard J Stephenson, The Thoresen Foundation, KMLE 107.9, LIVE 101.5 and KOOL FM sponsored the event.

“It was such a pleasure to be involved in such a fun, unique event as St. Jude Presents: A Night in the Crimson Tide,” said Martha Martin. “I am thrilled that in its third year the event was able to exceed its fundraising goal by 30-percent, raising $260,000 in support of the lifesaving mission of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.”

Highlights of the night included an inspiring speech by St. Jude SVP of Field Development Chris Boysen. He shared patient Ann Brinkmann’s compelling story of survival and educated guests about the new St. Jude global efforts to raise the international survival rate of children diagnosed with six of the most common forms of cancer from 20 to 60 percent in the next decade.

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Special guest Jamie Korn shared her 7-year-old daughter Bridget’s journey battling osteosarcoma at St. Jude. Bridget joined her mother on stage injecting humor into Korn’s narrative. Touching all those in attendance, she thanked the guests for supporting St. Jude’s mission of battling childhood cancer. The evening ended on a high note as Pat Bondurant was honored with the 2019 Letitia Frye Humanitarian Award. Bondurant was chosen for her tireless efforts in chairing, volunteering and donating her time and resources to help raise millions of dollars for hundreds of charities, including St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. “When I got the call that I was receiving the St Jude Children’s Research Hospital 2019 Letitia Frye Humanitarian Award, my heart was so moved,” said Bondurant. “There is not a breathing person on earth who would not be moved by the hope that lives in the St Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Every parent’s face carries that look of hope when their doctor approaches them, the hope that today is their child’s day to receive one of the many miracles that are performed in those amazing buildings.”
Above: Left to right; Susie Muzzy, Vicki Vaughn and Martha Martin.

Recipients of the Letitia Frye Honorary Award are leaders in business and in the community, who dedicate their time, talent and/or treasure to children’s health and wellness. The award was named after its first recipient, Letitia Frye, a philanthropist, “auctiontainer” and Valley native.

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the leader in the way the world understands, treats and defeats childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases. It is the only National Cancer Institute-designated St. Comprehensive Cancer Center devoted solely to children. Treatments invented at St. Jude have helped push the overall survival rate from 20-percent to 80-percent since the hospital opened more than 50 years ago, and it won’t stop until no child dies from cancer. St. Jude freely shares the discoveries it makes so doctors and scientists worldwide can use that knowledge to save thousands of more children. Families never receive a bill from St. Jude for treatment, travel, housing or food – because all a family should worry about is helping their child live. For more information, visit www.stjude.org