THE PHOENIX SYMPHONY
Revolution:
Music of the Beatles. A Symphonic Experience.
Text by Tyler Phillips

Accompanied by hundreds of rare and unseen
photos, Revolution takes audiences on a magical,
musical, and visual journey of The Beatles.

Above: Revolution, a tribute to the Fab Four, will be centerstage at Phoenix Symphony Hall this weekend.

The Beatles come to life in Revolution, the new authorized symphonic tribute to the Fab Four, featuring top vocalists and musicians accompanied by Grammy-winner Jeff Tyzik’s new arrangements transcribed and arranged from the original master recordings at Abbey Road. 

The Phoenix Symphony will be conducted by Matthew Kasper, as photos and videos in this program will be projected onto a large screen above the orchestra.

Accompanied by hundreds of rare and unseen photos from the historic, London-based archives of The Beatles’ official fan magazine – The Beatles Book Monthly – along with stunning video and animation, Revolution takes audiences on a magical musical and visual journey of The Beatles. The production features arrangements of over 25 top hits including “Ticket to Ride,” “Penny Lane,” “All You Need Is Love,” “Get Back,” “Here Comes the Sun,” and “Hey Jude.”

Above: Revolution: Music of the Beatles. A Symphonic Experience. performance with the Pittsburgh Symphony in November, 2019. 

The Story Behind the Song “Revolution”

The Beatles recorded three versions of “Revolution,” from an all-out rocker to an abstract collage, capturing the chaos and unrest of the summer of 1968.

With the exception of the two world wars, 1968 was surely the most explosive and divisive year of the 20th century. As the year dawned, the “Summer of Love” had mutated into the winter of discontent. Revolution was very much in the air, all around the world.

Student demonstrations in Paris brought France to its knees. Civil reform movements in Czechoslovakia threatened to destabilize the country. In London, anti-Vietnam demonstrators in Grosvenor Square clashed with riot police, resulting in 86 people being injured.

In the U.S., the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert Kennedy were the headline stories in a year that saw continuous clashes between anti-war or civil-rights protesters and police, climaxing with five days of protest at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. And, there was a rise in the women’s liberation movement, and any number of political causes emerged from the underground and the universities. 

John Lennon felt compelled to address the situation in what he wanted to be the next Beatles single. “Revolution” had been written in India, where John was detached from the turmoil enveloping the rest of the world. In it, John suggested that everything was going to be all right, and that maybe people would be better off freeing their minds rather than challenging institutions. “I still had this ‘God will save us’ feeling about it. That it’s gonna be all right.”

Revolution:
Music of the Beatles. A Symphonic Experience.
 The Phoenix Symphony
March 25, 26 and 27
www.phoenixsymphony.org